ux stuff

Bot

 

Bots Are Dumb; The Birth of @dumbUXbot

I set out to create a Twitter bot. I assumed it would make me feel shitty; like a bad net-neighbor. It didn't.

 
 

What's a "bot?"

A bot is a piece of software that does some task with some level of autonomy.

This is an extremely broad term. It includes malicious code that participates in DDOS attacks, code that adds utility to Slack (a chat application), or code that posts to Twitter. My references to "bot" refer to a Twitter bot.

How does one "Twitter Bot?"

Web applications often have something called an API. Speaking generally, an API allows someone to use the functions of a program without directly interacting with the UI. Instead of going to www.twitter.com, typing in the text box, and clicking on the "Tweet" button, the code will send tweets, retweet, or favorite automatically.
This is, of course, a simplification.


Technical Stuff is Hard

I'm no programmer.

I set off trying to determine how to set up a Twitter bot on a server. This included a bunch of requirements that I didn't comprehend, let alone know how to follow.

This is unfortunate, since I had good and some fun dumb ideas.
A math bot, a UV index bot, a bot that complains about the weather in emojis, a pair of bots that bicker a la Amy and Klara which is one of my favorite pieces of art.

As a UX designer, I value pragmatism. Learning a whole new skill set was dragging out my timeline and would be educational until I got put on a project full-time—I'd fall out of practice and forget what I learned anyway.

So I searched for a more practical solution.  


Feature 3

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